Collection

Sitting Woman (a sketch)

Jacek Malczewski

  • Sitting Woman (a sketch) 2
  • Sitting Woman (a sketch) 3
Basic information
ID
Ж-2185
Author
Jacek Malczewski
Name
Sitting Woman (a sketch)
Date of creation
c.1908–1910
Country
Poland
Technique
oil painting
Material
canvas oil
Dimensions (height x width, cm)
246 x 133
Information about author
Author
Jacek Malczewski
Artist's lifetime
1854–1929
Biography
Jacek Malczewski (July 14, 1854, Radom, Kingdom of Poland, Russian Empire – October 8, 1929, Krakow, Republic of Poland) was an outstanding artist and one of the most prominent representatives of Polish Symbolism. He studied at the School of Fine Arts in Krakow, where his teacher was Jan Matejko. The artist participated in an archeological expedition to Pamphylia, Pisidia, and Greece, which was organized by Count Karol Lanckoronski. He also visited Munich and Italy. Jacek Malczewski was one of the founders of the art union "Sztuka" ("Art"). The artist's creative heritage includes landscapes and portraiture, symbolic compositions, interpretations of religious themes, and numerous self-portraits in various images.
Object description
This is a sketch of a strong red-haired woman in a brown dress sitting on the ground. The woman's body is turned three quarters to the right, and her head is depicted full face; her pose is full of dignity. With a hint of arrogance, the woman looks directly at the audience. The woman's legs are tucked under her; her right hand draws something from the basket, while the left one looses hold (throws down?) of the same object. Sketches of two blurred figures, as well as a conditionally marked forest and sky are painted behind the woman. There is a noticeable portrait resemblance of the woman in the sketch with another model represented in the famous painting “Medusa” by Jacek Malczewski. It is probable that the portrayed person is Maria Balowa, the wife of the mayor of the town of Tulyholove near Lviv. She was a close friend and muse for the artist for many years. Jacek Malczewski portrayed her as a muse, a Bacchanal, a Samaritan, and the Medusa.