Collection

Young Lesia

Yaroslava Muzyka

  • Young Lesia 2
  • Young Lesia 3
Basic information
ID
ФМз-Рз-246
Author
Yaroslava Muzyka
Name
Young Lesia
Date of creation
1960
Country
Ukraine
Culture
Eastern Europe
Technique
enamel
Material
copper enamel
Dimensions (height x width, cm)
11.8 x 10.2
Information about author
Author
Yaroslava Muzyka
Artist's lifetime
1894–1973
Biography
Yaroslava Muzyka (Stefanovych) was born in Zaliztsi in Ternopil region on January 10, 1894. She died on November 24, 1973, in Lviv. She was an artist of diverse preferences and talent. She turned to graphic art – linocuts, woodcuts, drypoint, monotyping; painting – oil, tempera, gouache, encaustic; mosaic and enamel, on glass, grattage on gold or silver foil, batik, embossing on leather, embossing on metal. She studied drawing and painting at the L. Podhorodecki Free Academy of Fine Arts in Lviv, and at the Academy André Lhote in Paris. In 1928 she trained as an art restorer at the I. Grabar Central State Restoration Workshop in Moscow. She also worked at the National Museum in the restoration workshop. Yaroslava Muzyka was one of the founders of the Association of Independent Ukrainian Artists (AIUA), a Ukrainian public art organization that operated in Lviv from 1931–1939. In 1937, the artist learned the difficult technique of burning enamel objects by attending Maria Dolnytska classes in Lviv. She also taught herself from French and German enamelling books. The artist worked in the technique of bulk (scenic, painted) and cloisonne enamel. The favourite subjects of her enamel works were: Hutsul demonology, pagan mythology, beliefs of ancient Slavs, the works of T.G. Shevchenko, images of animals, female portraits.
Object description
The copper plate, on an ochre background, shows the head of a young woman in profile, turned to the left. Elongated face with thin nose, narrow lips. Long yellow hair, tied up with a ribbon, falls to her shoulders.
Portrayed person
The name of the person portrayed
Lesya Ukrainka
Lifetime of the person portrayed
1871–1913